Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Global Consensus for Golf in the Race to Tackle Physical Inactivity

(London, England) - A global consensus amongst leaders in public health, public policy and sport backs golf in the race to tackle physical inactivity and the prevention of a range of non-communicable disease (NCD) including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer of the breast and colon.

Evidence linking golf and health, commissioned by the World Golf Foundation and supported by The R&A, was presented this week in London at the 7th Congress of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health (ISPAH). The biennial scientific meeting is widely regarded as the world’s flagship physical activity and public health event attended by more than 1,000 delegates from 60 countries.

Recognition that playing golf has significant physical health and wellness benefits and can provide moderate intensity physical activity to persons of all ages, comes just months after the World Health Organization (WHO) published its Global Action Plan for Physical Activity. The Global Action Plan targets one in four adults, and four out of five adolescents (11-17 years) who are insufficiently active, and charts how countries can reduce physical inactivity in adults and adolescents by 15% by 2030.

The scientific consensus for golf is evidenced in research led by the University of Edinburgh and published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Findings reveal that playing golf is associated with a range of physical and mental health benefits, and further collaborative efforts to improve access for the sport are needed.

New studies are underway to discover if playing golf improves strength and balance, contributing to a key public health goal of fall prevention in healthy aging and into conditions such as dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

Marking the close of the ISPAH Congress, public health practitioners, policymakers and golf industry leaders were hosted at a satellite event in the Palace of Westminster by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Golf.

Steve Brine, Minister for Public Health and Primary Care, said, “Physical activity of any type comes with a range of physical, social and mental benefits. For some, golf can be a great way to stay active and there’s growing evidence about ways the sport can help those living with long term conditions such as Parkinson’s and dementia. And for those who haven’t discovered their favourite sport yet it’s never too late to get inspired, connect with people and improve your wellbeing.”

Martin Slumbers, Chief Executive of The R&A, said, “Golf is working hard to encourage more people into the sport, who will realise its many health benefits. With 60 million golfers spanning six continents, golf has found common purpose in working with public health practitioners and policymakers to optimise the health benefits of playing the sport.

“We recognise the importance of the World Health Organization Global Action Plan for Physical Activity and we will work with our affiliates and partners around the world to help improve health and well-being through golf”.

Professor Fiona Bull, WHO Programme Manager, Non-Communicable Disease Prevention, said, “Non-communicable disease is responsible for nearly three quarters of all premature deaths globally, including 15 million deaths per year in people aged 30 to 70 years.

“The new World Health Organization global action plan and the implementation toolkit ‘ACTIVE’ aims to help all countries improve the environments and the opportunities for all people to be more active. Golf is a popular sport for men and women and it is great to see golf’s global leadership recognising health priorities and identifying ways golf can be more accessible to more people.

“I took up golf in my 30s but thought it was a very technical, expensive and elitist sport. Thankfully a 6 week ‘come and try course’ showed me how easy it was to enjoy golf as a beginner and how active playing 9 holes can be. I am looking forward to seeing how golf can attract many more girls and women to enjoy the sport and be more active and healthy”.

Annika Sorenstam, Major Champion and a global ambassador for golf and health, said, “As the recent international consensus statement highlighted, golf is great for the health of people of all ages – it benefits those playing the sport and even tournament spectators.

“Given the health benefits, we must work together to make golf more accessible if we are to achieve our sport’s full potential.”

The 2018 International Consensus Statement on Golf and Health to guide action by people, policymakers and the golf industry was published last month in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

A further Golf and Health Scientific Meeting will be held on Thursday 18 October 2018 at Mytime Active, High Elms Golf Course, Bromley, UK – a club promoting healthy lifestyles. Researchers from Asia, Australia, Europe and the USA will discuss their respective projects and the future direction of research on golf and health.

For more information, visit www.randa.org.

About the World Golf Foundation
The World Golf Foundation is a non-profit organization that unites the golf industry to support initiatives that enhance growth and access to the game. Founded in 1993 and supported by major international golf organizations and companies, WGF oversees the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum, The First Tee, WE ARE GOLF and other programs.

About the Golf and Health Project
The Golf and Health Project is studying the varied health and wellbeing benefits of golf, considering any risks, and publishing their results in international, peer-reviewed journals.

The Project works independently but with the support of the World Golf Foundation, which comprises the major golfing bodies worldwide, including The R&A, the European Tour, USGA, the Masters Tournament, their constituent members worldwide, and the Ryder Cup Development Trust.

The Golf and Health Project also aims to translate the evidence discovered into a relevant format for players, potential players, decision makers and the wider golf industry. It also engages with international bodies responsible for public health and supports policies such as the WHO, Global Action Plan on Physical Activity.

1 comment:

Mr Beste said...

Ok, I just wanted to clear something up from my previous email.

It seems my suggestion about how Mr Miyagi and the Karate Kid could help you create your perfect, powerful and repeatable golf swing confused some people…and even caused some concern that I’d lost my marbles!

I know the connection sounds a bit crazy, but let me explain…

In my last email I said: “If you remember why Mr Miyagi was teaching the Karate Kid to “Wax On, Wax Off”, then Michael’s 6 Step Golf Lesson will make perfect sense to you.”

No?…Still not making any sense?

Well, it’s all about the true secret to a powerful, repeatable golf swing….muscle memory. Here’s what I mean:

(If you’ve never seen the 1980’s Karate Kid movie and plan to watch it soon, this is a spoiler alert!)

In the film, the young student, Daniel, asked the old Master, Mr Miyagi, to teach him karate. When Mr Miyagi reluctantly agreed, Daniel expected to be trained how to kick butt right then and there. Instead Mr Miyagi confused his eager student by making him polish his old car. But more importantly he insisted Daniel use very specific arm movements. So, using big outward circular movements Daniel had to “wax on” with one hand and “wax off” with the other.

Absolutely nothing to do with karate…or so we thought! We were so wrong!

It turns out that later in the movie young Daniel uses these exact “wax on, wax off” movements to powerfully deflect incoming punches and kicks from his nasty opponent.

Daniel unknowingly learned these vital defence moves easily, embedding them deep in his muscle memory, so they became second-nature and completely automated.

That’s what Michael Bannon’s 6 Step Golf Lesson does for your golf swing.

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It embeds your perfect swing deep in your muscle memory, automating it and creating more power and accuracy.

The training is unique but it’s not difficult, in fact you might be tempted to think it’s TOO EASY…but don’t let yourself be fooled. Just like the karate kid, have faith in the Master’s teaching.

Check it out for yourself right here. ===> Karate helps golf?…Really?? <=====

Just as Daniel put his trust in Mr Miyagi, you can put your trust in Michael Bannon. After all, if Rory McIlroy believes in him, I guess you can too.

See you inside.

P.S. Remember to K.I.S.S. Check it out here. ===> No.1 Golf Coach Reveals Simple Technique <=====